Rick Williams

Rick Williams, tribal name Touthli (translation: Lone Wolf), demands justice after a Seattle policeman killed his brother and fellow artist John T Williams on 30th August 2010. The brothers are members of the Ditidaht First Nation, also members of the nation of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth, both master wood carvers exponents of totem art as is their family tradition. Rick Williams brother John T Williams who was hard of hearing with cognitive impairments was allegedly fatally shot four times by a Seattle police officer after being ordered to drop an artists legal short sized folding wood caving knife he was holding with the wood sculpting material and did not drop it in the time allowed by the officer. On the artist Touthli yellow arm label are the words: Danger Police in Area. Seattle 1st October 2010

footnote:
It is a custom and a common practice for Native Americans to be carving wood on the streets of Seattle, a city that has a sizable creative indigenous population. First Nation Tribal Americans often carry around short bladed wood caving knives in Seattle. Indeed Seattle is named in honor of an Indian Chief Seattle (Sealth or Si'ahl) of the Suquamish tribe. After the legal challenge to the police for wrong doing, one does not seem to see these delightful Native American artist crafts people carving in the public area now !

Date: 01/10/2010

Location: Seattle, USA

Photographer: Richard Keith Wolff

Rick Williams

Rick Williams, tribal name Touthli (translation: Lone Wolf), demands justice after a Seattle policeman killed his brother and fellow artist John T Williams on 30th August 2010. The brothers are members of the Ditidaht First Nation, also members of the nation of the Nuu-Chah-Nulth, both master wood carvers exponents of totem art as is their family tradition. Rick Williams brother John T Williams who was hard of hearing with cognitive impairments was allegedly fatally shot four times by a Seattle police officer after being ordered to drop an artists legal short sized folding wood caving knife he was holding with the wood sculpting material and did not drop it in the time allowed by the officer. On the artist Touthli yellow arm label are the words: Danger Police in Area. Seattle 1st October 2010

footnote:
It is a custom and a common practice for Native Americans to be carving wood on the streets of Seattle, a city that has a sizable creative indigenous population. First Nation Tribal Americans often carry around short bladed wood caving knives in Seattle. Indeed Seattle is named in honor of an Indian Chief Seattle (Sealth or Si'ahl) of the Suquamish tribe. After the legal challenge to the police for wrong doing, one does not seem to see these delightful Native American artist crafts people carving in the public area now !

Date: 01/10/2010

Location: Seattle, USA

Photographer: Richard Keith Wolff